Am i missing something?

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alan(wrexham)

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Feb 24, 2009
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I keep hearing/reading about people using braid because......."there is zero stretch,unlike mono, that means every knock is felt". They then add anything up to10m of mono shock leader to prevent crack offs and some even put powergum on terminal end. Surely this defeats the object of the braids "superior " bite detection.
Or as in title......am I missing something.
 

buygoodtackle

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Over 60m a 10m length of mono will not cause much loss of sensitivity, however I am unusual in that I do not use a shock leader with braid, I prefer to adopt a smooth casting technique rather than punching the feeder out, this does require a rod capable of it!
 
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Hathers

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Alan it aids casting as well, greater distance and as diameters are low compared with Mono, can help with the horrid bow you can get on those windy long distance days.......although having said that i’ve converted my braid spools to a very low stretch mono.
 
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alan(wrexham)

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Thanks Mark.
Never gave a thought to thickness of braid v mono. Makes more sense now. What low stretch mono have you gone with?

PS,hope you/family are well
 

Poolfodder

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Braid I use is .12 and is rated 12lb, not seen the need for many years to use a shock leader. Got to remember to use a soft actioned rod when using braid, also I never fish with less than .15 bottom, usually .17 even for silvers.
Never strike just lift into bites and make sure your clutch is set on the soft side re giving line.
Where it's allowed I much prefer to use braid.
One point I forgot to add, I don't use the line clip, braid is too unforgiving if a fish takes off. Prefer to use a doubled up laccy band on the spool
 
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Mar 31, 2009
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Powergum/Feedergum can be very useful. It doesn't prevent the braid from doing it's job at all as it won't stretch until under tension with a fish already attached. That means that when you get a bite it doesn't instantly start stretching - the braided mainline doesn't stand still whilst the gum stretches. It all moves together as one.
 

alan(wrexham)

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See that's where I got confused in the start. I thought(wrongly) that the powergum/mono activates before getting sign to braid.
Thanks
 

Big Steve

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Alan, like previous posters have said, I also don't use a shockleader as such but I do use a much longer hooklength than normal. When I first experimented with braid it was done purely to magnify bite indication when fishing 60 to 100 yd far bank chucks on the Thames and, at first, it was very, very frustrating as just about every single bite was a proper wrap around with the hooklength breaking virtually every time even without striking. Whether I'm right in my thoughts or not I figured that it wasn't the initial bite that was causing the breakages but almost a sort of recoil as the bite stretched the hooklength until it suddenly hit the weight of the feeder. As we all know, if you take a length of mono and take a strong steady pull from either end it takes quite a bit of strain before reaching breaking point whereas if you do the same test but jerk the line it tends to break much easier. I then started making my hooklengths longer and longer [trial and error !] until I arrived at a length of about 3 foot for a breaking strain of about 3lbs and stronger but anything up to 6 foot for lighter lines. The bite indication was still outstanding compared to mono straight through but even the savage Chub bites were no longer snapping the line on the take but you do need a softer rod and a different steadier playing action when landing fish. Another big plus with braid on flowing water was the thinner diameter meant less drag on the line and thus allowed the use of much lighter feeders which, in turn, meant those savage bites were now not suffering so much from the 'recoil' I mentioned earlier as the initial take hit the weight of the feeder.
Anyway, that's my take on braid for feeder fishing on bigger rivers, I hope that may help you get your head around it and that it didn't sound too boring.
 

Hathers

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I have for a few seasons being using braid on method/hybrid for bream in both summer and winter, i use an 8lb mono shock leader. This has been fine for the 2-4lb fish but my local has had an explosion of 8oz to 1.8 fish now willing to feed and i’ve been losing quite few due to method/hybrid bounce (I have to use free running so no Laccy systems) so i’ve switched to a low stretch mono (Milo Fortess Iron).....as others have said I would still use braid on a cage feeder and advocate Steve’s stronger Hook Lengths, if i was casting 40mtrs or further (often 60-80) then i prefer a shock leader.
 

Poolfodder

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I have for a few seasons being using braid on method/hybrid for bream in both summer and winter, i use an 8lb mono shock leader. This has been fine for the 2-4lb fish but my local has had an explosion of 8oz to 1.8 fish now willing to feed and i’ve been losing quite few due to method/hybrid bounce (I have to use free running so no Laccy systems) so i’ve switched to a low stretch mono (Milo Fortess Iron).....as others have said I would still use braid on a cage feeder and advocate Steve’s stronger Hook Lengths, if i was casting 40mtrs or further (often 60-80) then i prefer a shock leader.
Hathers, put a slight bend in the plastic tube your line runs through. Still free running but under any pressure i.e. a fish, the line tightens up and the feeder doesn't move. Still runs up and down on slack line.
 
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garethevans1986

Gareth Evans
Oct 3, 2009
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I've fished with braid both with and without a shockleader over the past 1-2 years. For bream I tend to fish with a shockleader and for roach without. With braid even a small roach bite can be really violent because of the lack of stretch.

I've used some cheap Chinese braid that has been really rough, others like Daiwa's and Colmics are alot smoother. You have to bear that in mind when it's running through the rings of your rod.

Hooklengths tend to be 0.12-0.20, the thicker the better sometimes to "kick" it away from the feeder. Double hooks where allowed too (certainly takes some getting used to), hooks from a size 16-12, sometimes 10s for Bream in the summer, generally Hayabusa 157s in a size 14s.

It's really interesting and enjoyable fishing. I've been on the Winsford Flash (£5 per day and you have the river behind the Spit), River Weaver and looking to get to Rudyard Lake (Leek area) once the lockdown is over.

If anybody in the NW fancies some feeder/bream fishing, get in touch and we can arrange something.
 

RobB

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I've fished with braid both with and without a shockleader over the past 1-2 years. For bream I tend to fish with a shockleader and for roach without. With braid even a small roach bite can be really violent because of the lack of stretch.

I've used some cheap Chinese braid that has been really rough, others like Daiwa's and Colmics are alot smoother. You have to bear that in mind when it's running through the rings of your rod.

Hooklengths tend to be 0.12-0.20, the thicker the better sometimes to "kick" it away from the feeder. Double hooks where allowed too (certainly takes some getting used to), hooks from a size 16-12, sometimes 10s for Bream in the summer, generally Hayabusa 157s in a size 14s.

It's really interesting and enjoyable fishing. I've been on the Winsford Flash (£5 per day and you have the river behind the Spit), River Weaver and looking to get to Rudyard Lake (Leek area) once the lockdown is over.

If anybody in the NW fancies some feeder/bream fishing, get in touch and we can arrange something.
Count me in Gareth. Rudyard Lake was the first place I ever fished! But would have a go on any of the places you have mentioned.
 

Blobby

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Mate, I’m up for that. I work shifts so it would be date depending. It’s been a while since I fished Rudyard, I have heard the pegs are a bit treacherous and they’re now charging £10 a day ticket.

I’ve never fished the flashes. Always wanted to but never got round to it.


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garethevans1986

Gareth Evans
Oct 3, 2009
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It's £7.50 a day on Rudyard lake and online ticket only. Ive seen some of the pegs so would probably warrant a drive down to walk the length the far end of the lake.

I know I'm planning on heading there this week (Wednesday/Thursday) as I'm between projects at the moment.
 

Blobby

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Let us know how you get on and what it looks like. I’m committed Wednesday, booked on the over 55s on Old Hough and back at work Thursday.


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